amnhnyc:

Knowledge about plants that can cure or harm has been prized, and feared, for hundreds of years. In this enchanted book, you’ll find out which poisons are produced by which plants, and flip the pages to reveal history and folklore. 

Read the Enchanted Book now, and come see The Power of Poison before it closes August 10!

kelsium:

You can tell a girl she’s smart her whole life, encourage her in school, buy her a chemistry set, send her to math camp, help her apply for college scholarships in STEM fields, and she’s still eventually going to walk into a classroom, a lab, or a job interview and have some man dismiss her existence, deny her funding, pass her over for a promotion, or take credit for her work. How about you work on getting those assholes out of power and quit telling me not to call girls pretty.

(via adventuresinchemistry)

coolchicksfromhistory:

Agnodice, circa 4th century BCE

Art by Intagliogia (tumblr)

Midwifery is a branch of medicine traditionally reserved for women.  As medicine evolved into an academic discipline, female practitioners such as midwives were often pushed out.  When Hippocrates (c. 460-370 BCE) founded his school at Cos, he limited female students to an auxiliary program in obstetrics and gynecology.  After Hippocrates’s death, the leaders of Athens discovered some female medical practitioners performed abortions and taught contraceptive techniques.  In response, the city fathers barred all women from practicing medicine and made working as a female medical practitioner a capital crime.  Maternal and perinatal mortality skyrocketed as many Greek women were unwilling to have their baby delivered by a male physician

A young Athenian woman of this period, Agnodice disguised herself as a boy in order to study medicine with Herophilus in Alexandria.  After qualifying as a physician, Agnodice was called on to attend a difficult birth.  Concerned for her modesty, the mother was unwilling to accept the help of a male physician so Agnodice exposed her body to show she was a biological woman.  The mother gratefully accepted Agnodice’s help and as word spread of this rogue female physician, Agnodice’s practice grew.

Jealous that this young physician had become so popular so quickly, Athenian physicians began to accuse Agnodice of seducing her patients.  In order to defend herself from these charges, Agnodice publicly revealed her body to show her biological sex.  Agnodice was put on trial for violating the law banning female physicians, a crime that carried the death penalty.  A mob of female supporters rallied to her defense and Athenian leaders were so moved that they not only spared Agnodice’s life, they changed the law so that female physicians could treat female patients.

Some believe that Agnodice is a mythical figure.  There are no known contemporary accounts of Agnodice’s life.  She first appears in Gaius Julius Hyginus’s Fabulae, a collection of fables from the first century BCE.  Furthermore, the name Agnodice means “chaste before justice” which is in keeping with the ancient Greek practice of naming fictional characters after their virtues.  The story of Agnodice’s life may be a parable to understand the need for female physicians such as Aspasia who are known to have practiced medicine around the time Fabulae was composed.

(via dead-men-talking)

sagansense:

scifigeneration:

At-home 3-D printer can make items out of used plastic bottles

The new Ekocycle Cube 3D Printer from Cubify, which uses filament cartridges produced from three recycled 20 oz. PET plastic bottles, will cost around $1,200 and come out later this year on Cubify. The material supposedly has the durability of standard 3-D printer filament. And it’s made by will.i.am, 3D Systems’ chief creative officer, so that’s fun too.

Read more | Follow micdotcom

OH. SNAP.

(via shychemist)

scienceshenanigans:

metricparty:

If you ever read anything that tells you a common chemical or food compound is dangerous without citations or exposure limit, then you can be sure the author has a chemophobic agenda. [source]

This. Fucking this forever.

(via adventuresinchemistry)

Q: Girls are discouraged? That sounds so 1970s.

A: There was a 2001 study that showed in fourth grade, 68% of boys and 66% of girls like science. Starting in sixth, seventh and eighth grade, we lose girls and boys, but we lose more girls and for different reasons: lingering stereotypes, societal pressures. It’s well known that many girls have a tendency to dumb down when they’re in middle school. Just last week, I was talking to senior executives, and a woman told me that she was the best biology student in high school and had the highest exam scores. At the end of the semester, a teacher told her: “I’m sorry, but I’m going to have to give the award in biology to a boy, because it’s more important to him.” Almost every time that I give a speech or meet with a group of women, I’ll hear such stories.

Q: Boys earn 70% of the D’s and F’s in school and account for 80% of dropouts. Shouldn’t we fear more for their future?

A: It’s a big problem. Women earn the majority of undergraduate degrees in the U.S. and last year earned more Ph.D.s than men. But keeping girls in the science and math pipeline is a separate problem with different causes. It’s important we address both. You don’t stop research on breast cancer just because heart disease is also deadly. You work on both.

Q: Suppose you were an executive of a corporation that needs engineers. You meet a girl in high school. She scored in the 99th percentile in math on her SATs, yet says she wants to major in psychology or go to law school, because those careers sound more interesting. What do you tell her?

A: I’d introduce her to the coolest female engineer in the company. Girls tend to have a stereotype of engineers being 65-year-old guys who wear lab coats and pocket protectors and look like Einstein. Try to make it personal to them and show them some of the cool things that they can do in engineering.

Q: Let’s talk Lawrence Summers. The Harvard president recently resigned after giving a controversial speech a year ago suggesting that men might simply be predisposed to be better at math and science. Is there at least a grain of truth in what he said?

A: (Laughs). Suppose you came across a woman lying on the street with an elephant sitting on her chest. You notice she is short of breath. Shortness of breath can be a symptom of heart problems. In her case, the much more likely cause is the elephant on her chest.

For a long time, society put obstacles in the way of women who wanted to enter the sciences. That is the elephant. Until the playing field has been leveled and lingering stereotypes are gone, you can’t even ask the question.

Q: I will anyway. There are many obvious biological differences between men and women. This can’t be one?

A: There are obvious differences, but until you eliminate the more obvious cause, it’s difficult to get at the question scientifically. Look at law, medicine and business. In 1970 — that’s not ancient history — law school was 5% female, med school was 8% and business school was 4%. You could have taken a look at those numbers and concluded that women don’t make good lawyers or doctors. The statistics might have supported you. But today, all of those fields are about 50-50.

— Sally Ride (the first American woman in space) giving awesome answers to insipid questions in this interview.  (via itsawomansworld2)

(via shychemist)

eccecorinna:

hemipelagicdredger:

mermaidskey:

mermaidskey:

oxidoreductase:

Lavoisier is having none of your shit.

Heeeey so fun fact: the woman in that painting is Lavoisier’s wife, Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze, who not only acted as Lavoisier’s lab assistant but also translated English and Latin texts into French so he could read them. But she didn’t just translate, she pointed out errors in the chemistry in some of the texts. Her observations of these errors convinced Lavoisier to study combustion, which led to his discovery of oxygen. She was also critical to the publication of Lavoisier’s Elementary Treatise on Chemistry in 1789. She kept strict records of every experiment they conducted together and drew detailed diagrams of all their equipment. She also threw amazing parties and invited all the brightest minds in science so her husband could pick their brains. After Lavoisier was guillotined she secured all of his notebooks and equipment for posterity.
In short: NOBODY KICKS MADAME LAVOISIER OUT OF THE LAB.

Also, a side note: My historian husband-to-be pointed some things out to me about this painting. Notice that Madame Lavoisier is looking at the viewer, and all the light is on her, while Lavoisier himself is physically smaller than her, in shadow, and looking up to her in reverence. This isn’t a candid photograph- all of these choices are deliberate. The painting isn’t of Lavoisier- Madame Lavoisier is meant to be the central subject. 
I can just imagine Lavoisier telling all his colleagues that his wife is really the one with all the clever ideas, and them patting him on the back and telling him he’s sweet for saying so.

more like


Rebloggin’ for the fantastic commentary and the edit :)

eccecorinna:

hemipelagicdredger:

mermaidskey:

mermaidskey:

oxidoreductase:

Lavoisier is having none of your shit.

Heeeey so fun fact: the woman in that painting is Lavoisier’s wife, Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze, who not only acted as Lavoisier’s lab assistant but also translated English and Latin texts into French so he could read them. But she didn’t just translate, she pointed out errors in the chemistry in some of the texts. Her observations of these errors convinced Lavoisier to study combustion, which led to his discovery of oxygen. She was also critical to the publication of Lavoisier’s Elementary Treatise on Chemistry in 1789. She kept strict records of every experiment they conducted together and drew detailed diagrams of all their equipment. She also threw amazing parties and invited all the brightest minds in science so her husband could pick their brains. After Lavoisier was guillotined she secured all of his notebooks and equipment for posterity.

In short: NOBODY KICKS MADAME LAVOISIER OUT OF THE LAB.

Also, a side note: My historian husband-to-be pointed some things out to me about this painting. Notice that Madame Lavoisier is looking at the viewer, and all the light is on her, while Lavoisier himself is physically smaller than her, in shadow, and looking up to her in reverence. This isn’t a candid photograph- all of these choices are deliberate. The painting isn’t of Lavoisier- Madame Lavoisier is meant to be the central subject. 

I can just imagine Lavoisier telling all his colleagues that his wife is really the one with all the clever ideas, and them patting him on the back and telling him he’s sweet for saying so.

more like

image

Rebloggin’ for the fantastic commentary and the edit :)

(via against-stars)

valdanderthal:

Statistical Classification Methods for Estimating Ancestry Using Morphoscopic Traits

-Joseph T. Hefner and Stephen D. Ousley

Abstract

Ancestry assessments using cranial morphoscopic traits currently rely on subjective trait lists and observer experience rather than empirical support. The trait list approach, which is untested, unverified, and in many respects unrefined, is relied upon because of tradition and subjective experience. Our objective was to examine the utility of frequently cited morphoscopic traits and to explore eleven appropriate and novel methods for classifying an unknown cranium into one of several reference groups. Based on these results, artificial neural networks (aNNs), OSSA, support vector machines, and random forest models showed mean classification accuracies of at least 85%. The aNNs had the highest overall classification rate (87.8%), and random forests show the smallest difference between the highest (90.4%) and lowest (76.5%) classification accuracies. The results of this research demonstrate that morphoscopic traits can be successfully used to assess ancestry without relying only on the experience of the observer.

*NEW METHODS!!*

It’s quite straight forward so let me break it down for you:

OSSA- 86.1% accuracy, only for American Black and White Populations 

-Use 6 of the original nonmetric scoring traits based on their accuracy (Hefner, 2009)

-Score the traits and write the corresponding OSSA score (0 or 1) for the number you scored the trait

-Add up the OSSA scores

-A score of 3 and less is American Black and a score of 4 and 5 is American White 

Decision Tree- 80% accuracy, only for American Black, White, and Hispanic Populations

-Use 6 of the original nonmetric scoring traits based on their accuracy (Hefner, 2009)

-Score the traits 

-Refer to the Decision Tree

-Beginning with the score from the Inferior Nasal Aperture, go left if the score is less than 1.5 and right if the score is greater than 1.5

-Follow the same process for each trait depending on which direction the chart takes you until you reach the bottom 

-The bottom box gives you the likely ancestry and the overlap with others 

Sources: 

Hefner, JT. 2009 Cranial Nonmetric Variation and Estimating Ancestry, Journal of Forensic Sciences 54:5 Wiley Online Library

Hefner, JT and SD Ousley. 2014 Statistical Classification Methods for Estimating Ancestry Using Morphoscopic Traits, Journal of Forensic Sciences Wiley Online Library

(via dead-men-talking)

Q

Anonymous asked:

How can I be a Time Lord?

A

shychemist:

From what I understand of Doctor Who you’re probably going to have to invent some biotechnology that doesn’t exist yet. This could include extending life span and the ability to transfer consciousness from one body to another.

All of this I see as theoretically possible, so one day you could too be a time lord (technology and science permitting).

The Doctor’s gadgets and technologies may be possible too in the future. Who knows? :O